Thursday, October 25, 2018

Architecture and Planting Merge in Unusual Town House Garden

Town House Garden

Town House Garden - This article will be particularly interesting for those of you who would love a garden but do not have much outside space. The ingenious planting schemes shown here could be adapted and adopted to suit many contemporary homes.

Town House Garden

Completed in 2010, this remarkable house and unusual town house garden project is in Singapore. The concept of a ‘Maximum Garden House’ is by Formwerkz Architects. The site available to this project was relatively small but the designers wanted to find ways to extend the garden space and integrate planting schemes both inside and outside the house. In addition, the home owners wanted to have safe places for their children to play, where they could have the freedom to be expressive but always watched over.

Picturesque Landscaped Walls in Unusual Town House Garden

Picturesque Landscaped Walls in Unusual Town House Garden

To create extra space for plants to thrive in this unusual town house garden, the designers looked vertically rather than to the traditional flat surface. Here an upright wall planting scheme has been established, set within a recess along the front boundary wall. In addition, an attractive miniature shrubbery has been created on the flat roof above the car-porch roof. This is a clever strategy that shows what can be done by claiming often neglected surfaces that would not normally be considered as part of a garden. All spatially challenged gardens could adopt a similar approach by making the most of what would have been ‘dead space’ in terms of horticulture.

Unusual Town House Garden

Unusual Town House Garden

In addition, a fabulous planter screen has been devised as part of the facade on the upper floor. As well as providing valuable space for vegetation this screen offers essential privacy and protection from the rain. So here the garden is actually merged with the architecture and acts like an organic curtain wall.


The basic structure of this vertical planting scheme is a development of the traditional window box. It is simply composed of a series of matching rectilinear planting boxes, and looks something like a louvred window shutter. Each window box is able to accommodate a row of small potted plants. These may be changed depending on the season. To keep the plants healthy, they receive water from a single irrigation tube on the upper shelf. The water that runs off this level keeps the lower plants adequately watered, so the maintenance of this garden feature is very easy. The beauty of this clever integration of architecture with organic planting is that the luscious vegetation is enjoyed from inside the house. The quality of daylight coming through the foliage is fresh and clean adding a healthy vibrancy to the tranquil living room.


Of course gardens are not just about plants, everyone needs access to outside spaces to enjoy the fresh air and children in particular need places to play and get exercise. Here, the sloping roof terracing is part of the staggered arrangement of the house and offers a fluid walkway connecting the interior and exterior zones. A space has been created for outdoor dining with a barbecue built in to a sunken section of the deck. A mosaic tiled surface becomes an integrated table, a bench and a fire pit. The sloping pathways are gentle enough to allow easy passage from one area of this unusual town house garden to another, they are also suitable for sitting on . These man-made ‘hills’ provide access right to the top of the house and all the exciting views that can be enjoyed from this highest elevation

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